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Dan Gibson

Member Since 05 May 2011
Offline Last Active Mar 03 2014 10:39 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Sana'a mosque and its qibla direction

07 July 2013 - 09:35 PM

If they know the latitude and longitude, how did they do to define the direction of cities and location from a specific place?

I ask here about the math formula linking between latitude and longitude to obtain the azimuth of a place?

Also, can you mention a real case that was done by them to define a place direction using terrestrial marks like what the prophet PBUH did?

You said" By that time the Petra Qibla had been forgotten, and people were looking for reasons why they mosque might have had a different Qibla", i understand from this that Sana'a people knew that mecca is behind Dhain by a straight line; no no no, is this a rational reasoning? It's totally against the science and the history; if that was the case i will be sure that they were very developed than 20th century people, i guess that they had theodolites, sextants, stopwatch: Else; was this done by coincidence?

The weighting is: this description is superhuman and miraculous.


As I mentioned in the first section, I will post an article on the science of qiyās in the download section.


In Topic: الجذور التاريخية لمكة شرفها الله تعالى

07 July 2013 - 09:31 PM

I have been working on a reply to you post, but have not had enough time to work very quickly. I am attaching a pdf article that addresses my opinions of Ptolemy's maps. I will also post the PDF article in the download section, and it will also be available at academia.edu (http://independent.a....edu/DanGibson1)

In Topic: نقاش بالعربية

07 July 2013 - 09:29 PM


I see that you are not proficient in these two branches of science, as evidenced by the non answer to the question how Nabataeans link between latitude and longitude to find the values of ​​azimuth directions between countries and cities.

The second evidence: the non response on the subject of the historical roots of Mecca wherein historical information outweigh the existence of towns and villages surroundings Mecca and el haram in Saudi Arabia.


You seem to have not read the chapters of the book on the archeological evidence and historical evidence. I did not answer about these because I have already written much about them. Please do not take my non-answer as an inability to answer. I simply do not want to start post the whole book here on this website. Also, you seem hung up on the science of qiyās. I will post a separate academic article on this topic in the download section in the future which hopefully will explain things better. But please do not try and match the science of qiyās with the British system of latitude and longitude. They are two totally different systems.


In Topic: Miracles in the Qur'an

07 July 2013 - 09:28 PM

I find refuting these claims very taxing. For instance, earlier it was stated that the number 19 was special in the Qur’an... and that بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم has 19 letters in Arabic, and that each of the words appear 19 times or a multiple of 19 times in the Qur’an. This is easy to claim, but it takes hours of research to demonstrate that it is totally false because one must go through and count the number of times the word appears. Ism appears. 33 times in the Qur’an, which is not a multiple of 19. When this is pointed out, my Muslim friends then pass over it to make other outrageous claims. It is not the role of scholars to go around debunking fantastic claims made by people who do not do their research, but simply pass on something they heard from someone else. Anyone who claims that the number 19 is miracle based on the earlier arguments is a liar or a fool. I assume they are a fool because they just pass on others say. In regards to miracles, even the Mufties do no agree what is miraculous.

Taking the number of letters in a statement and comparing it to the number of degrees multiplied by 90 and then claiming that 0.3529 is somehow equal to 31° 45' 52.9" N which is the latitude of Jerusalem near the dome of the Rock is simply foolishness. These two figures are not equal to each other in any way. Even if they were, this does not prove anything. It is simply noticing the that two things are similar. The same logic you are using was used by Florin Diacu in his book The Lost Millennium. He noticed that when comparing the Catholic Popes from AD 911 - 1376 that the length of reigns is very similar to the Kings of Judah (931-586 BC). Thus he assumed that they were describing the same list of rulers, and he removes 1000 years from human history. (Diacu, Florin, The Lost Millennium, History's Timetables Under Siege, Knoff Canada, Random House, 2005) You seem to be using the same twisted logic, and coming up with similar illogical conclusions. But this is just my opinion.


In Topic: نقاش بالعربية

30 May 2013 - 02:48 AM


I think that archeology alone is not enough to weighting your point of view, but the material sciences that can decide the case is astronomy, geography and history of their development.

I see that you are not proficient in these two branches of science, as evidenced by the non answer to the question how Nabataeans link between latitude and longitude to find the values of ​​azimuth directions between countries and cities.

The second evidence: the non response on the subject of the historical roots of Mecca wherein historical information outweigh the existence of towns and villages surroundings Mecca and el haram in Saudi Arabia.




Friend,

I chose not to answer your question about how the Nabataeans found latitude and longitude because this is all laid out in the book in detail and I chose not to copy and paste whole chapters with charts and illustrations into this discussion forum. This forum was designed to be a discussion of the material in the book for those who have read the book, not a place to repeat all the arguments that are already presented in the book.

However, your argument about the historical roots of the towns around Mecca is interesting. Most of our knowledge of Islamic locations comes from Yāqūt ibn ’Abdallāh al-Rūmī al-Ḥamawī who wrote his geography over 600 years after Muhammad. His book: Mu’jam al-buldān is available for download from the internet. You can download it from this site at: http://searchformecc...Downloads.html. There are five volumes. This is the source book I used when studying early locations. For instance close to Mecca was Thaniyyat al-Murar (Bitter Bush Pass) which even until today has never been identified in Mecca, although Yāqūt (Mu’jam al-buldan, VIII, 3) mentions it. I point out in the book where this is near Petra. Another important location is al-Bayḍā which was supposed to be very close to Mecca, and is very important in the account that Ḥajjāj gives in Ṭabarī Vol. VIII pg 126 when recalling his journey to the Holy City. Yāqūt (Mu’jam al-Buldan, II, 335) guesses that Al-Bayḍā must be another name for Tan’im. This is a problem, for if it was Tan'im then it would have been outside the sacred territory encircling Mecca. Yāqūt gives no sources for his conclusion. I believe the real Al-Bayḍā is a place by exactly the same name located only a couple of kilometers from Petra, just like it was described to be close to the Holy City. Another problem is the location of Aqaba. I spend all of chapter 23 presenting arguments that Aqaba in southern Jordan is the real Aqaba of Islamic history, and was a major market. (Sīrat Rasūl Allāh, page 198-199) as described in Al Ṭabarī (Volume 6, 1218, page 130-136). The Aqaba near Mecca is a small wadi with no one living close to it, and with no road through it to any place. It is only three miles from the Ka'ba, so how could it be a major market so close to Mecca? I beleive that after the stone was moved to Mecca people began to rename places after the original ones near Petra.

Friend, the material is all in the book if people choose to read it. I do not want to have to repeat everything on this website. The book is over 480 pages, and took years to research and write. Hopefully you will have opportunity to examine it some day and see what is there.